Predictors of Neurofeedback Outcomes Following qEEG Individualized Protocols for Anxiety

Keywords: neurofeedback, anxiety, qEEG-guided amplitude neurofeedback, predictor

Abstract

In this retrospective study, researchers examined effects of quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG), individualized neurofeedback treatment protocols for anxiety. The present study includes 52 clients with 53.8% (n = 28) self-reporting as male and included two time points (pre and post). Secondary analyses utilized a subset of client data (n = 21) with measurements from three time points (pre, post, and follow-up). All clients completed qEEG and self-report assessments. Clients agreed to attend a minimum of 15 biweekly sessions, for one academic semester. Findings from regression analyses revealed three predictors of posttreatment outcomes. In addition, analysis of a subsample of data assessed at three time points revealed statistically significant improvement from pre to post and sustained outcomes from post to follow-up. We discuss limitations and implications for future research.

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Published
2020-03-25
Section
Research Papers